Catalog: Rockland/Westchester Teachers' Center Institute

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1. GREENBURGH CSD NEW TEACHER INSTITUTE September 22, 2022 - June 8, 2023

Location: Woodlands HS/MS (Hartsdale, NY) - TBD

Audience: All grade levels

Dates: 9/22/2022 to 6/8/2023

Location: TBD

THIS CLASS IS ONLY OPEN TO NEW TEACHERS IN THE GREENBURGH CSD DATES AND TIMES: 3:30 - 4:30PM September 22, October 13, November 10, December 8, January 12, February 9, March 23, April 20, May 11, June 8, ***5 additional hours will be spent on assignments outside of our sessions
In accordance with Article 2 Sections 10-18 of the Education Law, all applicants for Certification in NYS registered programs are required to complete six clock hours of Training in Harassment, Bullying, Cyberbullying and Discrimination in Schools: Prevention and Intervention (DASA Training). This workshop will be both asynchronous and synchronous. The first 3 hours will be provided through Google Classroom (a Google invite will be provided). You will need to join using a personal Gmail account. The asynchronous portion will consist of a self-directed module based approach that will ask candidates to review the background and some of the laws associated with the DASA, timelines and concrete concepts. The modules will include both free responses and multiple-choice quizzes to ascertain your understanding before a certificate for Part 1 can be issued. You will have four days to complete the first 3 asynchronous hours. This 3-hour session must be completed prior to Part II which is on Sunday, December 11th. Part 2, also a 3-hour time frame, will dive deeper into the strategies and reporting procedures as well as proactive mechanisms for tracking, reporting, and preventing bullying and harassment in the educational/school environment, including cyber bullying. All participants must be available on Sunday, December 11th from 10:00am - 1:00pm to participate in synchronous Part II of the workshop which will be held via Zoom.

3. Metro Region - Consider the Source Fall Institute Teaching Historical Thinking and Culturally Responsive Content through Local Primary Sources

Audience: Teachers and School Librarians

Dates: 12/13/2022

Location: Iona University

Starting Soon
This workshop will be a day of learning, collaboration, and sharing for teachers and school librarians in the Metro NY region. Jordan Jace, statewide coordinator for Consider the Source New York and Education DirectoKeynote speaker will be Claire Bellerjeau, author of the book, ESPIONAGE AND ENSLAVEMENT IN THE REVOLUTION: THE TRUE STORY OF ROBERT TOWNSEND AND ELIZABETH c.2021r for the NYS Archives Partnership Trust, will facilitate a discussion focused on teaching historical thinking skills through culturally responsive content. Local Social Studies teachers will share lessons they created through the Consider the Source program using primary sources from local repositories. Participants will have the opportunity to collaborate and brainstorm lesson ideas around the Seal of Civic Readiness, Regents prep, and scaffolding historical thinking skills for young learners. Keynote speaker will be Claire Bellerjeau, author of the book, ESPIONAGE AND ENSLAVEMENT IN THE REVOLUTION: THE TRUE STORY OF ROBERT TOWNSEND AND ELIZABETH c.2021 Date: Dec. 13, 2022 Time: 9am - 3pm Location: Iona University Lunch will be provided.

4. Online BBT - Brain Based Teaching, January 2 - February 13, 2023(WTCI)

Audience: K-12 School Professionals

Dates: 1/2/2023 to 2/13/2023

Location: Online

Course participants will explore how the brain processes, stores, and retrieves information as well as the most effective teaching techniques that support students' learning. In order to ensure that all students achieve their potential, we will examine cutting-edge methods for creating lessons and assessments as well as for modifying instructional strategies. We will discuss a range of learning techniques that can be applied to enhance student mastery of relevant material and explore online materials that can complement and enhance your classroom lessons. At the conclusion of this class, you will have strategies and techniques to capture students' attention, keep it, improve their memory, and improve their test scores. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.
This FREE course is open to both consortium and non consortium teachers. However, priority registration will be given to EWTC consortium members. In this online book study, participants will learn about the Personal & Authentic Framework which solidifies the "what” and the "how” in creating the types of learning experiences that impact a lifetime. With the learner at the center, and held together by relationships and a culture for learning, the various ways in which teachers can make learning personal and authentic can be amplified. These include: Social-Emotional Learning; Culturally Responsive; Moments of Awe; Relevant & Contextualized; Interests, Passions, & Strengths; Creation & Design; Flexible Pace & Path; and Authentic Feedback. Supports for the process include the spaces in which children learn and the tools in which they use, both of which either amplify or hinder the learner. All participants must purchase the book before the start of the course.
Our country's diversity and demographics have changed what our classrooms look like. We all encounter students that have limited English, and we need to differentiate instruction to meet their needs. In order to meet academic success, this population needs to make linguistic gains in order to begin to master course content. Participants will work with evidence-based practices and instructional intervention strategies to improve language skills for this population. PLEASE NOTE THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.

7. Online: Addressing Conflict through Restorative Justice Practices, January 2 - February 13, 2023 (WTCI)

Audience: Teachers in Grades K - 12

Dates: 1/2/2023 to 2/13/2023

Location: Online

Restorative justice focuses on mediation and agreement rather than punishment. In the school community, offending students must accept responsibility for harmful actions and make restitution. Teachers who use restorative discipline practices find that classroom behavior improves dramatically. They have better relationships with their students and, therefore, less stress from unresolved conflicts. For the growing number of districts using restorative justice, the programs have helped strengthen school communities, prevent bullying, and reduce student conflicts. The benefits are clear: early-adopting districts have seen drastic reductions in suspension and expulsion rates and students say they are happier and feel safer. This course is appropriate for all K-12 school professionals. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.
As our country's demographics shift, the impact is evident in all our classrooms as we are teaching students from across the world. There is great potential for embracing cultures and enhancing instructional activities while bridging cultures between home and school. Course participants will review research-based strategies to better incorporate students from other cultures into the classroom. At the end of this course, you will be empowered to adjust instructional delivery to meet the needs of your classroom's changing demographics and improve educational outcomes for all students. PLEASE NOTE THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.

9. Online: ELL's Meeting the academic needs of English Language Learners January 2 - February 13, 2023 (WTCI)

Audience: Teachers in Grades K - 12

Dates: 1/2/2023 to 2/13/2023

Location: Online

English language learners present special challenges for teachers in today's classrooms. A successful ELL teacher learns to balance the language learning needs of the students with the appropriate content. The knowledge and skills students gain in ELL classes positively affect their lives at school and home. As the diversity of the United States increases, so too does the need for teachers of second language learners. Participants in this course will create lesson plans that incorporate strategies to reach ELL students. This class is appropriate for all K-12 teachers. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.

10. Online: Improving Students Outcomes through Effective Homework, January 2 - February 13, 2023 (WTCI)

Audience: K - 12 Educators

Dates: 1/2/2023 to 2/13/2023

Location: Online Only

Homework - the mention of the word makes the student in us tremble! As educators we know that we need to assign homework for various reasons from accountability to curriculum pacing demands. We can leverage our HW policies to improve student learning outcomes. Participants will assess their current HW practices and evaluate the components of an effective HW assignment. Teachers will also develop paperless assignments as well as flipped lessons and HW assignments. This class is appropriate for all K-12 educators. PLEASE NOTE THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.

11. ONLINE: Managing ADHD and LD in the Classroom, January 2 - February 13, 2023 (WTCI)

Audience: K-12

Dates: 1/2/2023 to 2/13/2023

Location: Online Only

All teachers have come across a student in their class with either ADHD or a Learning Disability.This course will give teachers an opportunity to examine current research geared towards helping all teachers work effectively with students with ADHD and learning disabilities. Teachers will understand the impact of ADHD on a student's performance, the difference between male and female students with ADHD and, at the conclusion of the course, will have a number of instructional strategies to implement in their classrooms. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.
In this book study, we will have a chance to examine the minds of behaviorally challenged students and school personnel to explore why children do not respond to antiquated disciplinary techniques and zero tolerance policies. During the course of this class, you will become familiar with the current Social Emotional Learning benchmarks. You will also have an opportunity to consider the value of a trauma informed, non-punitive and unilateral approach to reduce inappropriate behavior incidents. At the conclusion of the book study, participants will be able to use communication skills and proactive tools to model behavior that inspires collaboration to build productive relationships with students. Participants in this course may pick up the required book: LOST AT SCHOOL at the Teacher Center before the commencement of the class. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.
In this course, we will unpack effective and practical executive functioning strategies that can have a positive effect on our students' school experiences. Executive functions control and regulate cognitive and social behaviors like controlling impulses, paying attention, remembering information, planning, organizing time and materials, and responding appropriately to stressful social situations. Students have the potential to develop executive functioning skills and, by exploring which functions they need, educators can offer support in a variety of different ways. We will address challenges with time management, organization, self control and consequences of impulsive behavior. Through structure, strategies, and classroom support, executive functioning can have a positive effect on student learning and personal growth. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.

14. Online: Navigating the NYS Computer Science and Digital Fluency Standards, January 16 - February 13, 2023 (EWTC)

Audience: Educators K-12

Dates: 1/16/2023 to 2/13/2023

Location: Online

Wait List
This FREE course is open to both consortium and non consortium teachers. However, priority registration will be given to EWTC and NW/Putnam consortium members. In this online, asynchronous, self paced course, teachers will develop an understanding of the structure and content of the NYS Computer Science and Digital Fluency Standards. They will understand the guiding principles and lenses with which the standards were developed and how that relates to student learning. Some of the topics to be addressed include Strive for Equity in CS Education and Culturally Responsive-Sustaining Education. Teachers will also have an opportunity to explore and reflect on ways the standards can be met and implemented into their classrooms and will develop lessons customized for their students.

15. EDPD 5016.01/Differentiated Instruction Meets Understanding by Design

Location: North Rockland High School (North Rockland HS, )

Dates: 1/23/2023 to 3/27/2023

Participants will access text and research in whey which they will plan curriculum with the "end in mind.” Then, they will develop instructional units and learning strategies "to reach out to individual learners at their varied points of readiness, interest, and learning preference.” Course participants will develop curriculum adaptations and instructional strategies based upon tiered assessments. They will take these ideas and put them into action in their classrooms. Participants will develop the "big ideas” associated with curriculum designs. Then, participants will analyze and apply methods of differentiating products (content), process (instruction) and product (assessment). During input sessions, participants will learn to incorporate a variety of research-based strategies into their lessons. Course participants will develop curriculum adaptations that are responsive to the individual needs of all students while still maintaining a focus on academic proficiency and excellence for all students. These strategies will include: responsive teaching, ongoing formative assessment, and teaching for understanding in academically diverse classrooms. Participants will develop assessment tools to address the Six Facets of Understanding from the UBD model: Explanation, Interpretation, Application, Perspective, Empathy, and Self-Knowledge. Required Readings: How to Differentiate Instruction in Academically Diverse Classrooms. by Tomlinson, Carolyn (2017) 3rd ed. Alexandria, VA: ASCD; Essential Questions: Opening Doors to Student Understanding, by McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (2013) 2nd ed. Alexandriqa, VA: ASCD. If you are taking for graduate credit and do not have a non-matriculant account with the college contact jmurray@rockteach.org for more details.

16. EDPD 5031.01/Building Professional Learning Communities

Location: North Rockland High School (North Rockland HS, )

Dates: 1/25/2023 to 3/29/2023

This course will have two goals: (1) to facilitate Professional Learning Communities (PLC) in our schools through the habits of successful thinking and (2) assist participants in creating classrooms responsive to the needs of all students. These two goals will allow participants to grow professionally and push students beyond independence levels. By developing habits of thinking and collaborative communication skills with colleagues, participants will develop strategies to make their schools better learning communities and to make their classrooms more responsive to the needs of all learners. We will utilize the book How Full is your Bucket by Tom Rath and Donald O. Clifton as the conceptual framework. The book "reveals how even the briefest interactions affect your relationships, productivity, health and longevity.” Effective schools explicitly develop the skills and strategies of collegiality amongst staff members. Effective teachers have a profound impact upon student learning. Therefore, participants will develop thinking and communication skills to make them more effective teachers; improving their responsiveness in the classroom. Required Readings: How Full is Your Bucket? Educator's Edition: Positive Strategies for Work and Life, by T. Rath and D.O. Clifton Chicago: Gallup Press.2007;Beyond Discipline: From Compliance to Community, by A. Kohn Alexandria, VA:ASCD. 2006; Learning By Doing: A Handbook for Professional Learning Communities, 3rd ed. by, R. Dufour and R. Dufour New York: Solution Tree. 20126. If you are taking for graduate credit and do not have a non-matriculant account with the college please email jmurray@rockteach.org for more details.

17. EDPD 5012.01/Teaching Core Skills: Listening and Speaking

Location: North Rockland High School (North Rockland HS, )

Dates: 1/26/2023 to 3/24/2023

As a result of this course, participants will develop methods and strategies to integrate the core skills of listening and speaking into their curriculums. They will be able to infuse real-world problem-solving skills into content area curriculums. Participants will make student learning more enjoyable by better teaching the "noncognitive skills of learning” (Opitz & Ford, 2014). In this course, participants will learn to embed content-rich experiences into the classroom. Not only will participants achieve better product results from their students, but also witness students developing the lifelong learning skills of critical thinking, linguistic aptitude and cooperation. Participants will be able to make an immediate impact upon their teacher and the learning outcomes for students in their classes. The small group work and correspondence will be completed on the class wiki page. The link for the course is drgillwiki.wikispaces.com. This portion of the course requires posting on a discussion board. Participants will work towards a final project, creating interconnected lessons and reflections aimed at improving student learning. Participants will provide repository of classroom documents aligned with current NYS Learning Standards. Required Readings: Engaging Minds in the Classroom: The Surprising Power of Joy, by Opitz, Michael & Ford, Michael (2014) Alexandria, VA: ASCD; Teaching the Core Skills of Listening and Speaking, by Palmer, Erik (2014) Alexandria, VA: ASCD. If you are taking for graduate credit and don't have a non-matriculant account with the college. Please email jmurray@rockteach.org for more information. *Final projects and reflections submitted via online by March 24, 2023.

18. EDPD 5040.01/Responding to Literature with Power

Location: Online (online, ny)

Dates: 1/30/2023 to 4/24/2023

New
In this course, students will understand how to construct, teach, and enhance writing responses to texts. They will learn how to implement a yearlong framework that will move students from simple responses to multi paragraph essays. Students will learn how to adapt their lessons to reach all learners. Finally, they will use the lessons taught to create a framework that is relevant to their particular students. REQUIRED TEXT(S): Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey. (2013). Better Learning Through Structured Teaching: A Framework for the Gradual Release of Responsibility, 2nd Edition Paperback. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Kylene Beers and Robert E Probst. (2013). Notice & Note Strategies for Close Reading. New Hampshire: Heinemann. If you are interested in taking this course for graduate credit, contact Joleen at jmurray@rockteach.org for more information on registering. Synchronous dates are listed, the remaining hours will be asynchronous.
This FREE course is open to both consortium and non consortium teachers. However, priority registration will be given to EWTC consortium members. The NYSED Culturally Responsive-Sustaining Education Framework names one of its principles as "Ongoing Professional Development” where teachers are expected to engage in ongoing professional learning and support. The Teacher Center DEI Book Club will provide an opportunity for all educators to engage in a professional learning community with peers around DEI topics. For the Winter/Spring Edith Winthrop Teacher Center DEI Book Club, we will be reading "Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-First Century” edited by Alice Wong. "This anthology of contemporary essays by disabled people gives a glimpse into the rich complexity of the disabled experience, highlighting the passions, talents, and everyday lives of this community. It invites readers to question their own understandings. It celebrates and documents disability culture in the now. It looks to the future and the past with hope and love.” What to expect: All participants are asked to purchase the book before the start of the book club cycle All participants are asked to read the book and come prepared for book discussions across three live mandatory Zoom meetings: February 16th - 4:30 - 6:60 p.m. (Discussion will be on the Introduction and Part1: Being) March 2nd - 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. (Discussion will be on Part 2: Becoming and Part 3: Doing) March 16th - 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. (Discussion will be on Part 4: Connecting, About the Editor and About the Contributors) All participants are required to do three asynchronous assignments after each live Zoom discussion

20. EDPD 5013.01/Digital Tools to Support Meaningful Learning

Location: North Rockland High School (North Rockland HS, )

Dates: 2/16/2023 to 4/20/2023

Educators and support staff will become experts on using digital tools to communicate, create, collaborate and assess students. Participants will gain an understanding of Internet tools to create online resources, screencasting, assessments, online portfolios, communication options for students and parents, and how to maximize the learning environment to reach students through different learning mediums. No textbook is required for this course. Critical reading of assigned articles and supplementary materials are embedded throughout the course. If you are taking this course for graduate credit and do not have an active non-matriculated account with Manhattanville contact jmurray@rockteach.org for details. *Final Projects and reflections delivered via online on Apr. 20, 2023.

21. EDPD 5037.01/Teaching Strategies for Students Living in Poverty

Location: North Rockland High School (North Rockland HS, )

Dates: 2/16/2023 to 4/20/2023

Students living in poverty face challenges that educators may miss in our school settings. Ruby Payne (2019) says that students living in poverty are often in "survival mode.” This can make learning in schools challenging, but certainly not impossible for students. As a result of this course, participants will develop methods and strategies that will best meet the learning needs of students living in poverty. Participants will understand the nature of poverty and how poverty affects behavior and academic performance. Once an understanding of poverty has been established, participants will "embrace the mindset of change” necessary to assist students living with poverty (Jensen, 2009). Participants will view students as having "fluid intelligence” and develop action steps necessary to positively influence the way in which students can better understand learning standards and grow as learners/thinkers. Finally, participants will develop classroom level factors to improve student performance following the SHARE method developed by Jensen in his book titled Teacher with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does To Kids' Brains And What Schools Can Do About It (2009). The SHARE method stands for: Standards-based curriculum and instruction; Hope building; Arts, athletics, and Advanced Placement; Retooling of the operating system; and Engaging instruction. Required Readings: Payne, Ruby (2019). A Framework for Understanding Poverty - A Cognitive Approach (Sixth Edition). Aha Press; Highlands, Texas; Kathleen M. Budge and William H. Parrett (2018). Disrupting Poverty: Five Powerful Classroom Practices. ASCD: Alexandria, VA. Jensen, Eric (2014); Engaging Students Living in Poverty. ASCD: Alexandria, VA. If you plan to take this for graduate credit and do not have a current non-matriculant Manhattanville account please email jmurray@rockteach.org for details. Final projects and reflections due via online on Apr. 20.

22. Online: Fostering Resilient Learners, February 27 - April 10, 2023 (WTCI)

Audience: All

Dates: 2/27/2023 to 4/10/2023

Location: Online

In this course participants will focus on the application of theories of teaching and behavioral guidance to foster resilient learners. Participants will learn how environmental factors impact students' ability to learn and demonstrate resilience. Through the use of specific methods and strategies, teachers will learn how to develop beneficial relationships and teach their students self-regulation techniques. Other topics include classroom organization, instructional methods, teaching style, grit, responsibility, emotional competence, engagement and much more. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.

23. ONLINE: Social and Emotional Development in the Classroom, March 1 - April 12. 2023 (WTCI)

Audience: K-12 Teachers

Dates: 3/1/2023 to 4/12/2023

Location: Online

Social and emotional learning, when embedded in the classroom (and in the school) curriculum, can have many positive student outcomes. It can reduce aggression and emotional distress among students, can increase collaborative classroom interactions, can improve self confidence and can lead to improved student learning. We will examine the five (5) keys to social emotional learning and look at how it translates to the classroom culture and to classroom management. We will view videos, read articles and explore various strategies that will work with our students. We will focus on self and social awareness, self-management, relationship skills, responsible decision making and how we can apply best practices in our classrooms. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.

24. Online: Auditory Processing Disorder (APD), March 6 - April 17, 2023(WTCI)

Audience: K-12

Dates: 3/6/2023 to 4/17/2023

Location: Online

APD is a disorder affecting a person's ability to understand speech and process auditory information. The impact that this disorder can have on a student is profound. How often do you have a student ask you to repeat something or have a delay in answering your questions? APD can have an impact on their classwork, homework, test scores, comprehension and retention. A student who has trouble processing incoming information or directions will give answers unrelated to the questions. In this online course, we will focus on what APD is, diagnosing APD, distinguishing differences between APD and other disorders, and treatment for APD. At the course conclusion, you will have strategies to modify your classroom teaching and compensatory strategies to allow students to become more successful in the classroom. This class is appropriate for all K-12 teachers. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.

25. Online: Autism Spectrum Disorder, March 6 - April 17, 2023(WTCI)

Audience: K-12

Dates: 3/6/2023 to 4/17/2023

Location: Online

We have all heard the expression, "on the spectrum,” but what does it mean? What implications can it have for your classroom? In this online courses, participants will review the characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder, Asperger's Syndrome and Pervasive Developmental Disorder. We will examine best instructional practices and methodologies and, at the end of the class, you will have the tools you need to enhance instructional practices for your students. This course is appropriate for all teachers K-12. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.

26. Online: Discussions and Questioning to Build Deep Thinking, March 6 - April 17, 2023 (WTCI)

Audience: Educators K-12

Dates: 3/6/2023 to 4/17/2023

Location: Online

This course may be taken for graduate or inservice credit. Since the two options are listed separately, please be sure to register accordingly. In this online course, participants will explore how to facilitate classroom discussions through engaging conversations, the role of teachers as coaches during this process and how best to provide a supportive classroom environment when integrating higher order questioning techniques. When we closely examine the value of student participation in small group discussions, we find that students are able to connect with each other's thoughts and opinions and are able to engage in higher level critical thinking. Critical thinking involves logical thinking and reasoning including the following skills: comparison, classification, sequencing, cause/effect, patterning, webbing, analogies, deductive and inductive reasoning, forecasting, planning, hypothesizing, and critiquing. We will examine the link between critical thinking skills and questioning techniques by taking an in depth look at Bloom's Taxonomy and the quote, "Maslow before Bloom.” At the end of the course, you will have the tools needed to transfer responsibility from yourself to your students to speak purposefully, think outside of the box and lead an effective and engaging classroom discussion. Participants will need to purchase the following required text to participate in this course - Walsh, J. A., & Sattes, B. D. (2015). Questioning for Classroom Discussion: Purposeful speaking, engaged listening, deep thinking. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.

27. Online: Work Hard/Think Hard: Principles of Effective Teaching, March 6 - April 17, 2023 (WTCI)

Audience: Educators K-12

Dates: 3/6/2023 to 4/17/2023

Location: Online

This inservice course may also be taken for graduate credit. Since the two options are listed separately, please be sure to register accordingly. In this online book study, participants will develop their own use of the principles of effective teaching and develop a master teacher mindset through the examination of the best-selling text Never Work Harder Than Your Students by Robyn R Jackson. We will explore how to engage students in the heavy lifting of learning through the use of units of study, lesson plans, assessments, interventions and classroom management. With a focus on the quality of learning and not the quantity of work; teachers will become better equipped to lead their students on a voyage of self-discovery and acquisition of academic knowledge. At the conclusion of the course, participants will have a unit of study, lesson plan, assessment and action plan to help them put the principles into practice immediately and effectively, challenging their students to work hard and think harder. PARTICIPANTS WILL NEED TO SECURE A COPY OF THE BOOK PRIOR TO THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE CLASS.

28. EDPD 5050.01/Discussions and Questioning to Build Deep Thinking (WTCI)

Location: Online (online, ny)

Dates: 3/6/2023 to 4/24/2023

In this online course, participants will explore how to facilitate classroom discussions through engaging conversations, the role of teachers as coaches during this process and how best to provide a supportive classroom environment when integrating higher order questioning techniques. When we closely examine the value of student participation in small group discussions, we find that students are able to connect with each other's thoughts and opinions and are able to engage in higher level critical thinking. Critical thinking involves logical thinking and reasoning including the following skills: comparison, classification, sequencing, cause/effect, patterning, webbing, analogies, deductive and inductive reasoning, forecasting, planning, hypothesizing, and critiquing. We will examine the link between critical thinking skills and questioning techniques by taking an in depth look at Bloom's Taxonomy and the quote, "Maslow before Bloom.” At the end of the course, you will have the tools needed to transfer responsibility from yourself to your students to speak purposefully, think outside of the box and lead an effective and engaging classroom discussion. Required Text: "Questioning for Classroom Discussion: Purposeful Speaking, Engaged Listening, Deep Thinking", by J. A. Walsh & B. D. Sattes, 2015, Alexandria, VA: ASCD. This course will run asynchronous online from July 1-August 6, 2021. Only start and end dates are listed. If you are taking for graduate credit and are not a student of Manhattanville, please contact jmurray@rockteach.org for info on creating your account.

29. EDPD 5055.01/Work Hard/Think Hard: Developing a Master Teacher Mindset (WTCI)

Location: Online (online, ny)

Dates: 3/6/2023 to 4/24/2023

In this online course, participants will develop their own use of the principles of effective teaching and develop a master teacher mindset through the examination of the best-selling text Never Work Harder Than Your Students by Robyn R Jackson. We will explore how to engage students in the heavy lifting of learning through the use of units of study, lesson plans, assessments, interventions and classroom management. With a focus on the quality of learning and not the quantity of work; teachers will become better equipped to lead their students on a voyage of self-discovery and acquisition of academic knowledge. At the conclusion of the course, participants will have a unit of study, lesson plan, assessment and action plan to help them put the principles into practice immediately and effectively, challenging their students to work hard and think harder. Required Texts: 'Never Work Harder Than Your Students: The Journey to Great Teaching', 2nd, by Robyn Jackson, Alexandria, Va: ASCD. 2018. This course will run asynchronous online from July 1-August 5, 2022. Only start and end dates are listed. If you are taking for graduate credit and are not a student of Manhattanville, please contact jmurray@rockteach.org for info on creating your account.

30. EDPD 5011.01/Creating and Leading a "Flipped” Classroom

Location: North Rockland High School (North Rockland HS, )

Dates: 3/16/2023 to 5/5/2023

Participants will develop strategies to create and lead classroom learning environments that are "flipped.” In 2014, the Flipped Learning Network defined flipped learning as "a pedagogical approach in which direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space, and the resulting groups space is a dynamic, interactive learning environment.” Participants will develop strategies to guide students as they "apply concepts and engage creatively in subject matter.” Participants will refine practices to related to delivering information outside of the traditional classroom setting. By flipping the learning out of the traditional group dynamic, participants will be able to lead student learning by developing more in-depth relationships with students. Participants will also learn how to lead a more fluid classroom where students interact creatively with the content and each other. This type of teaching requires the skills of transformational leadership and participants will utilize Flip Your Classroom: Reaching Every Student in Every Class Every Day (2015) by Bergman and Sams and Flipping 2.0: Practical Strategies for Flipping Your Class (2013) by Bretzman to find and refine these skills. If you plan to take this course for graduate credit and do not have a current non-matriculant account with Manhattanville please email jmurray@rockteach.org for details. *Final Projects and reflections due via email on May 5.
This FREE course is open to both consortium and non consortium teachers. However, priority registration will be given to EWTC consortium members. The NYSED Culturally Responsive-Sustaining Education Framework names one of its principles as "Ongoing Professional Development” where teachers are expected to engage in ongoing professional learning and support. The Teacher Center DEI Book Club will provide an opportunity for all educators to engage in a professional learning community with peers around DEI topics. The Edith Winthrop Teacher Center DEI Book Club will be wrappping its second year by reading "How the Word is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America” by Clint Smith. In this book, the author "leads the reader on an unforgettable tour of monuments and landmarks - those that are honest about the past and those that are not - that offer an intergenerational story of how slavery has been central in shaping in our nation's collective history and memory.” Smith "illustrates how some of our country's most essential stories are hidden in plain view - whether in places we might drive by on our way to work, holidays such as Juneteenth, or entire neighborhoods like Manhattan, where the brutal history of the trade in enslaved men, women, and children has been deeply imprinted.” What to expect: All participants are asked to purchase the book before the start of the book club cycle All participants are asked to read the book and come prepared for book discussions across three live mandatory Zoom meetings: April 20th - 4:30 - 6:60 p.m. (Discussion will be on the Prologue, Monticello Plantation and The Whitney Plantation) May 4th - 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. (Discussion will be on Angola Prison, Blanford Cemetery and Galveston Island) May 18th - 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. (Discussion will be on New York City, Gorée Island and Epilogue) All participants are required to do three asynchronous assignments after each live Zoom discussion

32. Online: Creating Trauma Sensitive Schools, May 1 - June 6, 2023 (WTCI)

Audience: All Educators

Dates: 5/1/2023 to 6/6/2023

Location: Online Only

Many of today's students are living with chronic trauma including homelessness, poverty, child abuse, neglect and exposure to violence in the home and in their communities. These experiences can lead to serious behavioral problems, wreak havoc on their ability to learn, and stunt academic growth. One of the problems educators face is identifying the symptoms of trauma since children don't always express their distress in a way that is easily recognizable. In this online course, we will address the root causes of trauma, specific confusing behaviors children might exhibit and discuss next steps to create a school environment where all students feel safe and can flourish - rather than fail - in and out of the classroom. PLEASE NOTE: THE INSTITUTE CANNOT REFUND A PARTICIPANT ONCE THE CLASS HAS COMMENCED.